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Valpolicella Ripasso Classico Superiore DOC ‘San Michele’

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Tasting Notes

Valpolicella Ripasso San Michele is made with all the traditional grape varietals of the Valpolicella (70% Corvina Veronese and Corvinone, 25% Rondinella, 5% Molinara). It is called Ripasso (re-passed or re-fermented) because it undergoes  a special winemaking process in which the young, fruity wine obtained by the first pressing and fermentation of the grapes, is fermented a second time with the skins and pomace from which the Amarone has been pressed. This process increases color, body and complexity of aromas. Aged in large Slavonian oak barrels for about 18 month.

San Michele Valpolicella Ripasso has an intense ruby color with garnet highlights. The Ripasso vinification process yields complex aromas of blackberries, plums and fruit juice with light notes of leather, cedar and spices. Medium-bodied and supple on the palate, polishing tannins and balanced acidity. Complex yet accessible, San Michele is ideal for all red meat, rich pasta dishes, spicy sausage, tangy BBQ and cheeses.

- 2014 rated 89 WS

- 2015 rated 90 WS – # 80 on Wine Spectator’s Top 100 List 2017

 

Winery

Michele Castellani

Region

Veneto

Varietal

70% Corvina Veronese and Corvinone, 25% Rondinella, 5% Molinara

Location of Vineyards

Ca’ del Pipa vineyard, Marano di Valpolicella

Type of Planting

Pergola

Soil

Clay and limestone

Type of Cultivation

Organic (not certified)

Vinification

Crushing and destemming at temperatures between 24° C – 28° C. San Michele undergoes the so-called ‘Ripasso’ process: the first fermentation yields a young, fruity wine, typical of Valpolicella. Then a second fermentation is carried out on the pressed skins and pomace from Castellani’s best amarones. This process increases color, body and complexity of aromas.

Aging

Aged in large Slavonian oak barrels for about 18 months.

Alcohol Content

14%

Total Production

90,000 bottles

Oenologist

Sergio Castellani